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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,172 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote powers we give to the government. just because something is technologically possible and just because something may be deemed technically legal does not mean it is the right thing to do.
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote technologically possible and just because something may be deemed technically legal does not mean it is the right thing to do. this summer many americans learned for the first time section 215 of the u.s. patriot act that for years has been secretly interpreted to authorize the interpretation of americans phone numbers on an unprecedented scale. the american public learned more about the government's collection of internet content data through the use of
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2013 6:00pm EDT
technology where modern means being able to meet reasonable standards for what we believe is in essential future low carbon economy. that is the first point. they are going to have a very long future. i also might add that the requirement was certainly not for a full capture. it was 430% to 50% of co2. note that the epa administrators have made very clear that the forthcoming rule on existing power plants would likely be very different. integrating these technologies into a new plant is trying -- different than trying to put it onto an existing plant. to your question in terms of the availability of the technologies. certainly all the components capture transportation and storage and are being demonstrated every day. we have 2000 miles of co2 pipeline. we have been capturing carbon dioxide for a long time at the great plains plant in north dakota. this is a 21 megatons of co2 just cannot project that have been used to enhance oil recovery. in the united states, we are today using about 60 million tons per year of co2. most of that is not from coal plants. in the future to elevate that, pr
Al Jazeera America
Sep 29, 2013 7:30pm EDT
why. i travelled to the heartland of america to find innovative ways to find technology to save the bees. late summer in barrett minnesota it is usually buzzing with activity. i think we are ready to walk down to the beehives. >> the midwest is known for the commercial bee industry. we have empty boxes not filled with honey. >> a big stack of empties with nothing. >> bee kooepers are witnessing an alarming problem. how many bees are we losing? >> the losses are avt ron omic am. i lost 65% of my operation last winter. we look in the ground to see if there's dead bees on the ground. most people in the u.s. would be happy staying away from the honey bee. >> they are critically important to the u.s. food supply. they provide $15 billion in revenue, and one-third relies on the industrious pollinators. the demand for pollinator crops, the fruit and vegetables, is increasing. the supply of bees is decreasing. the general term is colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon seen before, but this time it is different say the bee keepers. >> seeing a number of things that we have never seen bef
SFGTV
Sep 28, 2013 9:00am PDT
technology needs a culture shock" and respond to the civil grand jury on >> item number one is hearing to receive updates, from various city departments who were required to provide a response, on the implementation of recommendation nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, and 18 contained in the 2011-2012 civil grand jury report, entitled "dÉjÀ vu all over again: san francisco's city technology needs a culture shock" and respond to the civil grand jury on the >> item number one is hearing to receive updates, from various city departments who were required to provide a response, on the implementation of recommendation nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, and 18 contained in the 2011-2012 civil grand jury report, entitled "dÉjÀ vu all over again: san francisco's city technology needs a culture shock" and respond to the civil grand jury on the status of these implementations. >> item number one is hearing to receive updates, from various city departments who were required to provide a response, on the implementation of recommendation nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
SFGTV2
Sep 28, 2013 5:30am PDT
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2013 6:30pm EDT
of technology and politics n 2003 i joined howard dean's campaign and joined early in late april of 2003. and was on the campaign for almost exactly 12 months from early days to the very bitter end. my experience as a working for an insurgent candidate led me to think a lot about the roll of technology in impower insurgence against the establishment and it ewhere my book started? in 2007 and 2008, we watched the astonishing primary where hillary clinton, she and bill clinton built the democratic party and lost to the primaries to a man who was in public life less than a decade and that was a dramatic moment of the inurge sent winning. in the last couple of cycles we've seen a similar die 234578ic with tea party insurgents challenging successfully a number of senators in their own primaries as well as other candidates. and so the book started with my interest in the role technology plays in against the establishment. as i looked across a range of other industries and verticals i saw similar trend at work whether that can be in news, entertainment, in higher educa
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2013 8:00am EDT
the budget for the technology span of the executive branch, so it covers all the agencies of government and the department of defense to think about and form late the president's budget every year and do that. the second thing is through the e-government act that we have in the u.s., the u.s. chief information officer has the ability to set policy, statutory authority to set policy government wide with. so thinking about, you know, visionary view of technology use in government and driving that forward as part of the, part of the, what we do. and then the third is -- and this is really under this administration -- the u.s. chief information officer, a title and role created by president obama acts as an adviser to the president and the administration on the use of technology, the smart spend on technology driving both efficiency and effectiveness of technology in a 21st century government. >> host: how big is the technology budget for the u.s. government? >> guest: it's around $80 billion a year, and that ebbs and flows depending on the day, but it's roughly stayed the same. prior to 20
SFGTV2
Sep 29, 2013 7:30am PDT
ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city go
SFGTV2
Sep 29, 2013 8:00am PDT
with the 31 parks, and that we along with our technology partners, our communications partners, our department leaders, new ones as well as old ones, are saying this is just the beginning. this is literally the beginning of a continued effort to innovate, innovate, and innovate. and i like what mark said. not only are there no strings attached. really the benefits are targeted at our residents and our visitors, but that the only thing we're going to see is wireless connected to our fiber. we're learning that. we're learning that our fine and some of the backbones that we've always had to depend on can be improved on. i have to admit, the new director will also tell you we are behind. i call our self-the innovation capital of the world, but we're behind in many ways and we need to catch up. we need to do more, but sometimes the funding wasn't there and it costs more than we think and we're trying to figure things out and trying to get as modern as fast as we can. and this is where i think that relationship with the private sector, particularly with our technology and innovative compa
Comedy Central
Oct 3, 2013 9:00am PDT
that will -- it is truly technologically spectacular. >> yeah. they did an amazing job. >> jon: amazing. >> each frame had at least 250 people working on each particular frame at one point. that's how much love went into each frame. >> jon: so they -- but that's normally like what you do with an animated film. this is not animation. >> i mean, it's -- there's a part of it is that is similar. >> jon: really? you were in space. >> we were in space. right. >> jon: so when you're doing that, do you have any sense. how much trust do you have to have in this director, who is a fabulous director? >> you know, 1000%. >> jon: you have to trust. >> as all your actors have to trust you. >> jon: yeah. >> i think you're going to do an amazing job. you're going to be good at this. >> jon: we're getting there. the amazing thing is, normally a movie of this kind of technological precision and acuity doesn't have emotion in it. they find a way to bleed that out. >> it's because they're so concentrated on the amazing aspects of the effects, which they are amazing. i can see you getting lost in that. the way that alfonso us
FOX Business
Oct 2, 2013 9:20am EDT
cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. try align. it's the number one ge recommended probiotic that helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ stay in the groove with align. ♪ >> here we go. a minute to the opening bell. we are looking at a down side move for the dow. when we do open up, maybe 70 or 80 points. come in, tres knippa from chicago. you want to give me the reason du jour why we're down today? >> the market, a today feels like jim belushi's character in animal house and everybody says let's go. and everybody says the market rally, you had the feeling, guess what, the government shutdown doesn't matter. historically if you look at s&p performance, government shutdowns haven't been, had a meaningful impact. however, today you come in and the people who bought it kind of sit there and go, well, i've got questions about third quarter earnings. i've got
Al Jazeera America
Sep 29, 2013 8:30am EDT
to create jobs for our children or grandchildren. we think we can do that around water technology. >> mil e, ce off of badgermete. he says water companies have served dying industries survived by shift to go residential and other uses. they now make up a $9 billion industry with 150 water-related companies that range from multi-national corporations to up and coming startups that build green roofs that collect water. >> our city has been about move. we can be the silicon valley of water technology. >> supplying a type line. the university of wisconsin created the school of it fresh water studies and produced engineers, policy experts all specializing in fresh walt. >> there is a research they can use genetics to identify new water contaminants >> it's huge. i have been able to higher really top-notch talent who would have moved away otherwise. >> mcgee young is head of h 20 score and given subsidized rent. h 20 score expects to add 10 employees in the next year. just across the street, construction has begun on a publically funded $7 million water technology park. but the water council resi
Comedy Central
Sep 30, 2013 7:30pm PDT
to paradise. the question you ask the answer is both that science provides in the form of technology, weapons which have only been available to reasonably responsibility governments -- responsible governments will likely become available to nutcases who believe that their god requires them to wreak havoc and destruction. >> jon: doesn't it though let scientists off the shook to some extent to suggest that their work could only be misused by those whose minds are boggled by religious fanaticism. don't you think it's possibly more likely that we will create something that the unintended consequence of it is worldwide can catastrophe? >> it's possible. it's something we have to worry about. the precautionary principle, i think is very important. science is the most powerful way you want to do. if you want to do good it's the most powerful way of doing good and if you want to do evil it's the most powerful way. >> jon: i guess it's the third love for every equal action there's an opposite reaction. you split an add yom. you go -- atom and you can light the world going this way. and if you go this
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2013 5:30am PDT
that are there now in tokyo. >> is the annual consumer electronics show in japan and one of the big technologies being showcased this year, it aims to take the strain off tired or distracted drivers. >> the idea is to show that the car can drive itself. we also want to demonstrate that in the future we will create more technology to assist drivers and prevent them from making the mistakes caused by tiredness or not hanging tension. >> japanese technology giants are already planning on ways to cash in on the 2020 tokyo olympics. these smart glasses use camera technology to scan text into the language of choice, something developers will think of you -- will be of use to visitors unfamiliar with japanese. >> during the tokyo olympics people will be interested in japan. more and more people are going to come here. these translating glasses will be a useful tool for these visitors. >> it also showcases new developments in every technology , from high definition television to speakers that are considerably louder. >> in paris fashion week is coming to an end. tuesday fashionistas were treated to this
SFGTV
Sep 28, 2013 6:30am PDT
library. we are really excited about that. going to talk about assistive technology throughout this you will see examples of it. i just want to tell you what our definition is. assistive technology is a device or accommodation that provides equitable access to persons with disability. that's our goal in the library. we are now in the process of replacing a bunch of old computers. so i expected today that there might be public comment about problems with our computers and i just have to face that very straight forwardly. i'm very excited that we are going to be replacing all of these old machines with new ones as soon as we can. i don't have a complete date for this project, but we are hoping that we can actually make our computers based a team more flexible by including all of the software in all of the computers so that people will be able to choose which room they want to use them in and this is sort of a new experiment. we'll see how it goes. i appreciate people's fore bearance as we move forward. there is a picture on the side of the plastic tub. i wanted to talk about that for a
PBS
Sep 30, 2013 7:00pm EDT
-based expert on technology and how technology affects your life. mario armstrong is with us in the studio tonight. so good to see you. >> good to see you, too, man. it's been a while since i have been here. still good to see you. >> it's been a while, but i'm glad you brought all your toys with you, because we can talk about tellin technology a littl, but before the show, we were talking about how people are starting to get overly attached, maybe, to the technology. >> yes. >> and sit down at the dinner table and everybody's got their phone, and you will see teenagers, especially, communicating across the table electronically, saying, hey, mario, how are you doing? >> yeah, there was a viral video that came out recently, done on the conan o'brian show, and he went on this rant and it's seen 5 million times. he's saying kids aren't learning empathy because they're using these devices. if you tell a kid face to face, hey, you're fat, and the kid looks back kind of weird, you say, that doesn't feel good, i shouldn't call kids fat. he says kids try out being mean, first. he's a comedian, so t
FOX Business
Sep 29, 2013 10:00pm EDT
. the report was fascinating. a lot of detail. tell us about the two major technologies that are work and you lookeat in the study? >> this is an indication of a big change of how consumers will evaluate the safety of vehicles. this is the first-ever ratings, the vast technologies that are aimed at helping drivers avoid many kinds of crashes altogether . we elected to specific systems. forward collision warning systems which are intended to alert the driver to a hazd ahead and expect that the driver will then take action to avoid the crash. an automatic braking systems that can break the vehicle, the vehicle breaks itself if the driver does not take action and apply the brakes. and we know that in the real world both of these systems are using crashes. we have found that some perform better than others. gerri: 110 ask you this first. the systems are bundled into thes expensive technology an ounce, packages that people can buy. i have to tell you, i am not sure i am thrilled about automatic braking. why are people paying more attention when they're driving? >> people driving distracted, not pa
ABC
Sep 30, 2013 6:00pm PDT
handle this new wave of patients. david? >> technology had a owe profound impact. now, the health profession turning for tech help as several hundred thousand people started signing up tomorrow for a health care act coverage. >> california is facing a doctor shortage. by estimates reaching 17,000 two years from now. >> we have a shortage of primary care act. i'm hoping technology is going to allow a tool to make time with them more productive. >> that is why these entrepreneurs have arrived in silicon valley. dr. david wong also runs a start up called direct term tolling. doctors consult patients online. >> this enables to give access to patients quicker no, wait times no, need for the patient to take time off from work. >> today's connections will enable beam to connect medical experts via keyboard driven mobile devices. many discussions focus on getting smart phones in both directions. some technology will be behind the scenes such as helping doctors decide what tests to order its changing medicine but there is a lot of confusion in the community so we have a tool to help them s
KOFY
Sep 30, 2013 7:00pm PDT
a concern whether an overtaxed system can handle this new wave of patients. david? >> technology had a owe profound impact. now, the health profession turning for tech help as several hundred thousand people started signing up tomorrow for a health care act coverage. >> california is facing a doctor shortage. by estimates reaching 17,000 two years from now. >> we have a shortage of primary care act. i'm hoping technology is going to allow a tool to make time with them more productive. >> that is why these entrepreneurs have arrived in silicon valley. dr. david wong also runs a start up called direct term tolling. doctors consult patients online. >> this enables to give access to patients quicker no, wait times no, need for the patient to take time off from work. >> today's connections will enable beam to connect medical experts via keyboard driven mobile devices. many discussions focus on getting smart phones in both directions. some technology will be behind the scenes such as helping doctors decide what tests to order its changing medicine but there is a lot of confusion in the community
FOX
Sep 29, 2013 7:00am EDT
recommendation s following the tragedy... including real- time g-p-s tracking technology. five years after bernie madoff's multi-billion dollar ponzi scheme was uncovered... his longtime accountant... paul konigsberg is now facing federal charges. feds say konigsberg doctored account statements that played a key role in madoff's fraud. konigsberg... who is now 77 years old... is facing a range of criminal charges including conspiracy and falsifying the records of an investment advisor. konigsberg pleaded not guilty in federal court and was released on two-million dollars bond. if convicted, he could spend up to 40 years in prison. konigsberg is the 15th person charged in relation to the ponzi scheme, despite madoff's assertions that he acted alone. okay... sign me up! it is national coffee day... and if you are a fan of the java.... you can celebrate with some free coffee! some of your favorite places are participating. you can get a free cup at dunkin donuts -- if you download their smart phone app. krispy kreme, starbucks, and other coffee shops are also offering deals... or you can just brew a
FOX Business
Sep 29, 2013 9:00am EDT
thing to what rich said. what people tend to forget, that very innovation in technology and medical a lot of it driven by the government dollars by the way, which i don't think you like. that hasnak raised the price -- has in fact raised the price of medicine. it's a good problem. technology that keeps you and i around longer today and healthier but it costs money. >> david: so much of this is based on promises. you know, promise me taxes won't go up. promise me this will pay for itself. promise me this, that and now supposedly this is all the taxes. no, more. do you believe all the promises? do the american people? >> well, i think it's based more on cruelty. rich karlgaard is right, the best way to get to low prices is through the high prices. once you see the high prices in profit that attracts innovation and the competition. ople like rick want to blunt out the high price. result you get no innovation and no competition. >> david: bill, it's not like we don't have examples. we do have medicare and medicaid. we have seen how those turned out. they cost a lot more than people expe
ABC
Oct 4, 2013 12:35am PDT
down. we are still waiting. >> alexis, a government technology contractor used security clearances to march through the building where 3,000 military and civilian personnel work. the fbi released these surveillance tapes of alexis haunting the hauls, hunting for innocent targets. 1:30 into the rampage. alexis was shot to death exchanging gunfire with police more than an hour. 12 innocent people were killed. four wounded. it appears aaron alexis had a history of mental illness, hearing voices in his head and being taunted by microwaves. >> there are multiple indicators that alexis held a delusional belief he was being controlled or influenced by extremely low frequency or elf, electromagnetic waves. the horrifying navy yard attack stunned the capital. later that same evening, a burst of pops were heard in front of the white house sending night lockdown. secret service agents tackled a man. it turns out the pops were nothing more than firecrackers. >> if you live in washington, there is always a certain risk of something happening. you are not surprised if something happens. >> today
SFGTV
Sep 30, 2013 5:30pm PDT
of innovation going on a lot of things people are creating with technology and social services and part of that success is what do you think about this program. police officers will talk to doctors will talk to people and we'll all try to come up with better electrocutions u solutions. that's how you make a school even more viably vibrant. people talking to another person in other cultures and suddenly everybody is excited and this school is safer and it's inviting to you but to your friends and when you graduate were going to continue on and reach out to people who are looking at themselves not feeling loved, if you will, not feeling appreciated you'll be able to reach out and say hey, i want to include you. that's what i'm trying to do as mayor. this year outside of san francisco perhaps there's going to be millions of kids that are going to be booze and talked negatively about. we talk about schools all over this country this will change that and teach others what the impact is for bullying and i want to thank especially our san francisco skruth lead by the superintendent pr he's lea
SFGTV2
Sep 28, 2013 5:30pm PDT
technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking somebody in the eye and saying i care about where you're going and i don't want you to necessarily live the rough-and-tumble street life. get some she felt and food and take a moment and think about what's happening next week. we care about your background. we know there may not be other supporters in your life. we care about you a because we know about life and want to share >> compassion in san francisco. this is what project homeless is all about and hopefully with that opportunity something might occur where someone says i want to do something for my
SFGTV2
Sep 28, 2013 11:00pm PDT
on the road to technology and on comprehensive immigration reform. to work within the time we have i'm going to dispense with long introductions but let me mention the enterprises. this people has gnltd from europe and she co- founded her company. born in columbia we have alexander he is the do founder of voice bunny and he's a recent father and returned almost right after his little girl was born to the white house to be honored and we'll be hearing about that. and the third narrator is the chief at bright sons. we received his masters in commuter science and other degrees from ucla. join me in welcoming our panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with
SFGTV2
Sep 30, 2013 2:00pm PDT
call the stem economic scientists and technology and engineering and math; right? and the country has really go forward for a long time the fact we've got a to start in our high schools having a fairly substantial number of kids on a track brown where ware doing computer science to get the skills to go into the firms and no non-manufacturing companies and get good jobs. we decided we, you know, would send a sister-in-law that somehow the united states would generate the idea and produce all in china. in response other parts of the midwest large managing or merchandising companies and northeast ohio you saw philosophical in business and other global dynamics they're seeking substantially job growth are to the benefit of not just the kids of ph.d. from stanford or mit but a whole bunch of folks coming out of high schools and colleges with technical prosecutors. >> tests map silicon valley it's great with ideas they didn't get made in china but it's great if you're an engineer or not so great if you're a generate but mayor lee how this model stacks up in terms of the collaboration. >> t
ABC
Oct 4, 2013 11:00pm EDT
information. technology problems overwhelmed the launch of the new health insurance market on tuesday. >> the shutdown of the federal government. both sides wanted to end it, but neither willing to budge. there was an encouraging sign. apresentative peter king made statement to reporters signaling something might be shifting. moderate republicans like king could lead a discharge to fund the government. others believe there is no end in sight. leaders of both parties insist they are holding firm. because of the shutdown, lockheed martin announced 2000 employees will be furloughed starting monday, october 7. the number is expected to increase weekly the longer the shutdown continues. lockheed martin employs many people in montgomery county alone. call on the house to stop this leave the shutdown and get americans back to work" by isiah leggiet. -- we talk about a couple scrambling to book a new location days before their ceremony. >> consider this. they have committed thousands of dollars. there is no place to go. not only has the government shut them out, they were days away from their
PBS
Oct 3, 2013 7:00pm EDT
but without them, united technologies can't manufacture aircraft. and they aren't the only company affected by or voicing concerns over the government shutdown. earlier today the president said the shutdown is leading to further uncertainty with business leaders tied to d.c. >> companies worry businesses will be disrupted because in an area like maryland, virginia where there are a lot of federal workers, you don't know how that will impact the economy. >> reporter: boeing said a lack of u.s. aviation officials could delay jetliner deliveries. british based bae systems says pay and benefits for u.s. employees won't change for at least this week, but they continue to monitor the possible need for furloughs going forward. one thing seems certain, though, the longer the shutdown lasts, the more furloughs we could see. dominic chew, "nightly business report" in new york. >>> and joining us now to talk more about what is happening in washington and what the implications mean for debt ceiling talks is andrew freedman. welcome, pleasure to have you here. >> thank you. >> were you at all encouraged
SFGTV2
Sep 29, 2013 8:30am PDT
and cultural and a design and, of course, technology. but all of those companies that we're celebrated really make our city buzz and we're become a gravitational center. the calendar is completely filled and shows how innovation is in our city. sf music tech conference will be part of this month and the 4rb9 empowerment most will all happen and many other particular events will happen in the month of october. you can see those exciting event at the i of time of m innovative sf.com. i'm happy to kick this off. posted the next exciting event here putting our whole cities municipal code into get hub (clapping) >> you know what that means? that's credible. when i talk about bureau categorize nobody knows whether it effects our streets our parks or vehicle code the way we build offices this year so many laws public safety and others that it compacts so to post this on the get hub and to allow get hub to be our way in which people what navigate to break it down to make t it usedable by other coders it's kind of like sailing we have had to learn with taking was and to have that on the screen in fro
CBS
Sep 27, 2013 5:30pm PDT
? are you freaking kidding me? again? seriously. >> pelley: how well does accident prevention technology work? jeff pegues has the test results. and "on the road." a woman is mugged, a suspect arrested. then the story takes a steve hartman turn. >> so first time you see that picture, do you recognize who that guy is? >> yeah, in detail. ca captioning sponsored by cbs news" with scott this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. a short phone call but a major breakthrough in relations between the united states and iran. president obama and iran's new president rouhani talked today about their desire to reach an agreement on iran's nuclear program. it was the first contact between the presidents of the two countries since 1979, the year a revolution overthrew the u.s.- backed shah of iran, ayatollah khomeini returned from exile and student radicals seized the u.s. embassy in tehran, holding dozens of americans hostage for 444 days. major garrett is at the white house with more about the historic phone call and these fast-moving developments. major? >> reporter
PBS
Sep 27, 2013 6:30pm PDT
company, delivering and creating cars is a similar kind of thing with lots of technological challenges, logistical challenges. so he's certainly got the skills to do it. he ran the commercial airlines division of boeing. these are all very difficult and complicated jobs. i think the issue is, he's a non-techie, although he's quite technical, it's sort of besides the point. what they need at microsoft is a leader who can try to figure out where microsoft goes next. and the question is, is he too -- i don't want to say old, but he isn't of the new internet. does he have enough experience in where the internet's going, is more the point. >> carol, let me drill down a little bit more on your fine article there. and just to be clear, this is not speculation. the two of them are actually having conversations you characterize as serious conversations about this job. >> yeah. >> how far along are they and when might we expect to hear who microsoft has selected? >> i think it's going to take them time, actually. what's going on here is there are sort of twin things going on. you have the commit
PBS
Oct 3, 2013 6:30pm PDT
,000 federal workers. one major defense contractor, united technologies announcing planning to furlough thousands of employees if the shutdown drags into next week. it might not be alone. dominic chew has more. >> reporter: the shut down got real. aerospace and defense contract tomorrow united technologies released a statement that says it expects to furlough around 2,000 workers on monday, october 7th. they are located in connecticut, florida and alabama at the aircraft division that makes the well-known black hawk helicopter. it's the state's single largest employer. if the shutdown continues into next month it could furlough a total of 5,000 employees affecting all parts of the company. the issue has to do with a lack of inspectors from the contract management agency or dcma. they are deemed non-essential federal employees but without them, united technologies can't manufacture aircraft. and they aren't the only company affected by or voicing concerns over the government shutdown. earlier today the president said the shutdown is leading to further uncertainty with business leaders ti
SFGTV2
Sep 28, 2013 4:00pm PDT
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
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